Why Your Son Died

I received this via email and thought it was pretty to-the-point:

A mother asked President Bush,
“Why did my son have to die in Iraq?”

Another mother asked President Kennedy,
“Why did my son have to die in Viet Nam?”

Another mother asked President Truman,
“Why did my son have to die in Korea?

Another mother asked President F.D. Roosevelt,
“Why did my son have to die at Iwo Jima?”

Another mother asked President W. Wilson,
“Why did my son have to die on the battlefield of France?”

Yet another mother asked President Lincoln,
“Why did my son have to die at Gettysburg?”

And yet another mother asked President G. Washington,
“Why did my son have to die near Valley Forge?”

Then long, long ago, a mother asked. ..
“Heavenly Father, why did my Son have to die on a cross outside of Jerusalem?”

The answers to all these are similar —
“So that others may have life and dwell in peace, happiness and freedom.”



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2 Responses to “Why Your Son Died”

  1. Kender says:

    I have always found this to be amazing:

    ” Dear Madam, I have been shown, in the files of the War Department, a statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle.

    ” I feel how weak and fruitless must be any word of mine which shall attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save.

    ” I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.

    ” Yours very sincerely and respectfully, A. LINCOLN.”